Functions of the Conjunction

“But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength, they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” Isaiah 40:31

Functions of the Conjunction

Remember your high school English Grammar class? Back in the day, during the sixties, what I especially recollect about that class are the conjunctions, particularly the subordinate conjunctions like “and,” and “but.” As I recall “and” is an indication of addition and is used when the statements are similar.  However, “but” is used to connect statements that express opposite ideas. 

As an example, “I didn’t think I’d do well in that class, but I consistently achieved good grades.”

The inspirational text begins with the subordinating conjunction “But.” It follows Isaiah 40:30, “Even the youths shall faint and be weary, and the young men shall utterly fall:” Verse 31 “BUT they, that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.” [KJV]

We see here that the believer’s journey with Lord Jesus can be tedious and includes waiting, but his faithfulness and promises to his children is worth the wait.  Trials and tribulations are also among God’s promises, yet the function of waiting on Him is a promise of at least four-fold.  Why?  Because if we wait on the LORD during challenging times of struggle—trusting and waiting on Jesus we shall:

  • Renew our strength
  • Mount up with wings as eagles
  • Run, and not be weary
  • And walk, and not faint.

Just wait and see.

Yours in Christ,

Rev. Lurecie M. Stokes

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